May 2017

If you have children and live overseas, you probably spend time with them on the phone or video call with far-away family. How does that generally go for you? Our children (aged 3 and 5) approach every video call with their grandparents with tremendous anticipation and evident delight. They sit still and pay close attention […]

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Diane Stortz knows firsthand what it’s like to have children serving overseas, to want them to follow God’s calling, but also to want them close by. In 2008, she, along with Cheryl Savageau, wrote Parents of Missionaries: How to Thrive and Stay Connected when Your Children and Grandchildren Serve Cross-Culturally (InterVarsity Press). Since joining the ranks of […]

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The Myth of the Ever-Happy Missionary

by Kathleen Shumate on May 26, 2017

I don’t know if anyone has actually said it, but sometimes I feel it in the air: missionaries are supposed to be Very Happy. We are supposed to land in our host country and immediately love everything and everyone around us, floating on clouds of ministry bliss. But sometimes we aren’t happy. Sometimes as much […]

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It’s not hard for me to put down roots in a new place. Roots are all I want. That may sound unconventional coming from a Third Culture Kid, but Army life was unsettling, and even small tastes of stability were tantalizing to me. I’m always searching for roots. Specific places can be very healing to me, but […]

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Cross-cultural life can be a perpetual string of chaotic disruptions or beautiful rhythms — perspective and expectation make all the difference.   We’re about to do summer.  For us, as is true for many expats, June and July are two of the most discombobulated months of the year.  Going “home” (those are finger quotes) for example, is […]

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I recently walked through our old house. No one has lived in it since us. Actually, it flooded the 1st winter we lived in Mexico. It’s a gigantic mess: rusty nails pepper the floor; dust covered everything, holes in the walls, with a claw foot bathtub in the living room (no joke). As dust coated […]

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I remember when people dressed up to take airplane flights. Now, we just want sweatpants and ponytails (but be careful not to get bumped off for being inappropriately under dressed). I remember when flying felt exotic and fancy but lately it feels more like headaches and cramped quarters and clogged toilets. I keep asking my […]

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7 Ways We Secretly Rank Each Other

by Amy Young on May 15, 2017

Last week a friend wondered in passing, at the end of email, why some reasons to leave the field are more respected than others. She knew a couple who was leaving because their young adult children were not doing well in the US. Instead of being supported in their decision, they were asked why they didn’t […]

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Third Culture Kids (TCKs) have an exceptional ability to become “cultural chameleons.” They have the uncanny ability to subconsciously pick out the subtleties in a new culture and operate successfully in that culture even if they only move between their passport country and one host country. Because of this, adapting becomes their lifestyle. More than […]

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On Home and Keeping Place

by Marilyn on May 10, 2017

“Home is a human place. Instinctively, each of us, male and female, knows the sound of its welcome – and the joy of our possible return. This community knows the challenge of creating home in odd spaces and places around the globe. We also know what it is to be homesick, to long for familiar […]

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3 Kinds of Selfies You Should Never Take

by Craig Greenfield on May 8, 2017

This summer, church teams of young and old will don matching t-shirts and board a plane to some far-off place. But whether you are building houses in Mexico or volunteering at an orphanage in Guatemala – there is one item in your backpack that is GUARANTEED to undermine your ability to serve responsibly… The selfie […]

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Years ago, I read that people are like trees: made to grow. Sometimes, though, it’s like we’re planted under a big boulder, and that huge rock keeps us small and stuck, frustrated and trapped, unable to grow into all we were created to be. The advice to therapists in this particular article was:  help clients […]

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