Stories

Debriefing: Do I need it?

by Anisha Hopkinson on June 14, 2017

My husband and I didn’t know if we needed debriefing, we just knew we needed help. By the end of our first term we were worn out, angry all the time, and felt like our emotional buffers were paper thin. It didn’t take much to send us from seemingly content to all guns blazing. I’d […]

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The Gift of a “Second Salvation”

by Editor on March 29, 2017

Last July Jesus asked me to follow him to the hardest place I could imagine. After only seventeen months in the Middle East, that region I’d loved for years, he asked me to follow him back to America. It didn’t make sense to me or my husband. What about the years we’d spent studying and […]

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Thoughts on Sharing our Stories

by Marilyn on February 6, 2017

“Perhaps the greatest danger of our global community is that the person in LA thinks he knows Cambodia because he’s seen The Killing Fields on-screen, and the newcomer from Cambodia thinks he knows LA because he’s seen City of Angels on video.” ― Pico Iyer Years ago at a dinner party in Egypt, our English host was waxing wise about China. […]

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Looking Past or Really Seeing

by Richelle Wright on December 30, 2016

I was walking from a parking lot just up the road to a center where I was having a meeting recently. It was bitterly cold, a fierce wind blew more than gusted, and even bundled up, I was freezing. I usually love winter weather. After years of living in the Sahel, I appreciate… even relish… actually […]

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Don’t Ask Me About My Christmas Traditions

by Amy Medina on December 1, 2016

My first Christmas on African soil was when I had just turned six years old.  We had arrived in Liberia only three weeks earlier, and my mom was in the throes of major culture shock.  My parents had shipped over a few presents, but nothing else for Christmas.  My mom managed to find a two-foot […]

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Who’s Writing this Story Anyway?

by Richelle Wright on September 30, 2016

It has been 17 years since my husband and I, with our three four-and-under children, first left for the mission field.  Almost 20 years (and five more kids) since we first began preparing to make that move. But that wasn’t our first experience with missions. My husband’s parents had retired from their first careers to […]

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Savvy Expat Traveler or Overconfident Traveling Idiot?

by Rachel Pieh Jones on September 19, 2016

We’re expats and we fly a lot. Right? We can fill out a lot of immigration forms with our eyes closed, have passports stuffed full of visas. We can use several different currencies, even in a single transaction. We know how to pack liquids, how to sail through airport security lines, what kinds of snacks […]

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Hope Chases Us

by Lisa McKay on August 30, 2016

hope chases us

More than a decade ago now, my husband, Mike, spent almost two years working in Uganda. During that time, Mike was shadowed for a week by a National Geographic photographer as he went about his work. When the issue came out, the online feature was titled Hope in Hell: The reach of humanitarian aid. One […]

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The Mother of Modern Missions?

by Abby Alleman on August 26, 2016

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It was a Sunday morning. Sunshine filtered through the rose trellis by Lake Balaton. I stilled my heart and reflected upon the message I had just heard. Three pioneers of the faith were highlighted. One of them was William Carey, considered ‘the father of modern missions’. When talking about his home life, it was said […]

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Dear Parents of MKs, Hello. It’s me, an MK. I write this on behalf of other MKs who haven’t found their voices yet, who are still in the midst of constant transition, who haven’t sorted through the confusing and complex joys and sorrows that come with growing up MK. I write this on behalf of my […]

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10 Questions Missionary Kids Would Love to be Asked

by Taylor Murray on May 19, 2016

Most MKs are asked hundreds of questions during their families’ home assignments. Ironically, many of us leave our passport countries feeling unknown. In all honesty, we usually don’t answer questions well. Our fumbling answers can create distance.  Many times we feel as though these questions are asked politely, without time or desire to listen to […]

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Whistle Belly Thumps

by Tara Livesay on April 29, 2016

One after the other after the other – after.the.other … The people, both large and small, that reside in my home, clenched their buttocks with superhuman strength and ran in desperation for the latrine. What began as one person with some loose stool for a single unremarkable day, somehow turned into a three-week multi-generational back-door […]

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